Carbohydrate The Daily Dose of Poison – Dr Gary Fettke

carbohydrate, the dose is the poison

In this video, Dr. Gary Fettke talks to you about carbohydrates. Dr. Gary Fettke is an Orthopaedic Surgeon practicing in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. He has a major interest in preventative medicine and encourages his patients to lose weight before undergoing surgery.

Please note that this video is created with the aim of educating its audience and the content on this channel is not medical advice. Remember to consult your healthcare provider for personalized advice. In the article “Carbohydrate: The Daily Dose of Poison – Dr. Gary Fettke,” you will learn about the fascinating insights shared by Dr. Gary Fettke, an Orthopaedic Surgeon based in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.

Dr. Fettke has a special interest in preventive medicine and encourages his patients to prioritize weight loss before undergoing surgery. In this video, he dives into the topic of carbohydrates and their impact on our health. It’s important to note that the content of the video is for educational purposes only and should not be considered medical advice. Please consult with your healthcare provider for personalized guidance.

Throughout the video, Dr. Fettke explores the harmful effects of excessive carbohydrate intake and emphasizes that the body treats anything more than one teaspoon of sugar as toxic. He delves into the history of our ancestors, who primarily consumed low carbohydrate diets consisting of fresh, local, and seasonal foods.

However, with the rise of the agricultural revolution, the abundance of refined carbohydrates has contributed to the deterioration of our overall health. Dr. Fettke highlights the differences between glucose and fructose, two types of carbohydrates with distinct metabolic pathways.

Elevated blood glucose levels can lead to diabetes and other chronic health complications, causing organ damage, inflammation, and oxidative stress. It’s clear that excess glucose in the blood and tissue can result in significant end organ damage, such as kidney failure, heart attacks, and neuropathy.

So, join Dr. Fettke as he enlightens us on the potential dangers of carbohydrate consumption and the importance of adopting a low-carb, healthy fat lifestyle.

Carbohydrate: The Daily Dose of Poison – Dr Gary Fettke

Dr. Gary Fettke: An Introduction

Dr. Gary Fettke is an Orthopaedic Surgeon practicing in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. With a major interest in preventative medicine, Dr. Fettke encourages his patients to lose weight before undergoing surgery. The video featuring Dr. Fettke discussing carbohydrates and their effects on our health is intended to educate the audience and is not medical advice. Viewers are advised to consult their healthcare provider for personalized medical advice.

The Link Between Carbohydrates and Health

Dr. Gary Fettke has long been fascinated with sugar and carbohydrate intake and their impact on our health. According to him, excessive carbohydrate intake can be damaging to the body. In fact, the body treats anything more than one teaspoon of sugar as toxic. This understanding is rooted in biochemistry and evolution.

The Effects of Excessive Carbohydrate Intake

The advent of the Agricultural Revolution marked a turning point in human health. With the development of cropping and farming practices, there has been a significant increase in refined carbohydrates in our diets. This shift has resulted in the deterioration of our overall health. Refined carbohydrates play a major role in the deterioration of our health due to their different metabolic pathways compared to fresh, local, and seasonal foods.

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The Historical Perspective on Carbohydrate Consumption

Before the Agricultural Revolution, our ancestors primarily consumed low carbohydrate diets consisting of fresh, local, and seasonal foods. These diets were rich in healthy fats and proteins, with carbohydrates coming primarily from seasonal fruits. Carbohydrate availability was uncommon in nature during the time of our ancestors, approximately 10,000 years ago.

Different Types of Carbohydrates and Metabolic Pathways

Carbohydrates can be categorized into glucose and fructose, each with its own metabolic pathway. Glucose and fructose are not essential for mitochondrial function, unlike fats and proteins. While the body goes to great lengths to remove excess glucose and fructose from the bloodstream, it does not have a safe transport mechanism for carbohydrates in the blood. This inability to safely transport excess carbohydrates in the blood suggests that glucose and fructose in excess may be toxic to the body.

Carbohydrates and Mitochondrial Function

Contrary to popular belief, carbohydrates are not essential for mitochondrial function. Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, can effectively utilize fats and proteins as fuel sources to produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the energy currency of the body. Mother Nature has not made us dependent on one seasonally available carbohydrate. The science inside the mitochondria supports this claim, while outside of the cell, food has become more about politics, money, and emotion.

The Brain’s Fuel Source

The brain, unlike common belief, is not solely dependent on glucose as its fuel source. The brain can efficiently utilize a combination of lactate, ketones, and glucose obtained through gluconeogenesis (the production of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources). The brain can function well without being solely reliant on glucose for its energy needs.

The Dangers of Elevated Blood Glucose Levels

Elevated blood glucose levels can lead to diabetes and other chronic health complications. When blood glucose levels rise, there can be acute complications such as agitation, fatigue, increased thirst, and increased urine output. Prolonged elevation of blood glucose results in diabetes and chronic complications associated with it.

The Consequences of Excess Glucose in the Blood and Tissue

Excess glucose in the blood and tissues can cause end organ damage. Kidney failure, heart attacks, and neuropathy are among the health issues that can arise due to excess glucose levels. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed from high blood glucose levels contribute to inflammation and oxidative stress in the body, further worsening the health complications caused by excess glucose.

In conclusion, Dr. Gary Fettke’s video sheds light on the harmful effects of excessive carbohydrate intake. Our ancestors primarily consumed low carbohydrate diets from fresh, seasonal foods, which contributed to their overall health. The abundance of refined carbohydrates and the agricultural revolution have had a detrimental impact on our health.

Understanding the different types of carbohydrates and their metabolic pathways can provide valuable insights into the body’s handling of glucose and fructose. Moreover, it is important to recognize that carbohydrates are not essential for mitochondrial function, and the brain can efficiently utilize alternative fuel sources.

Elevated blood glucose levels can lead to diabetes and various health complications, including end organ damage. It is crucial to be mindful of our carbohydrate intake and explore alternative fuel sources to promote and maintain optimal health.

carbohydrate dose is the poison, sugar

Further duscussions:

Here’s a comprehensive summary of his key points:

  • Toxic Threshold: Dr. Fettke argues that the human body treats any carbohydrate intake over one teaspoon as toxic. This assertion is based on our biochemistry and evolutionary history as hunter-gatherers, who consumed a diet low in carbohydrates and high in healthy fats and proteins.

  • Agricultural Revolution: About 10,000 years ago, the development of farming led to increased carbohydrate availability, which has correlated with a general decline in health over centuries. The last century, in particular, has seen a surge in refined carbohydrates and processed foods, paralleling a significant rise in health issues.

  • Carbohydrates’ Role: Carbohydrates, including glucose and fructose, are processed by the body in unique ways. Despite the biochemical pathways to metabolize them, humans have no dietary requirement for carbohydrates, as the body can produce enough for its needs when they’re absent from the diet.

  • Metabolic Response: The body goes to great lengths to remove excess carbohydrates from the bloodstream due to their toxic potential. This includes glucose and fructose, which are not efficiently transported in the blood and are quickly absorbed from the gut to be metabolized and removed.

  • Health Implications: Chronic consumption of carbohydrates beyond the body’s requirements leads to various health problems. These range from the immediate metabolic stress of removing excess sugar from the blood to long-term issues like insulin resistance, diabetes, and organ damage.

  • Alternatives and Solutions: Dr. Fettke advocates for a low-carb, healthy fat lifestyle as a preventative and therapeutic measure. He also discusses the metabolism of glucose versus fructose, the implications of hyperglycemia, and the damaging effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on organs.

  • Toxicity and Dose: The notion of toxicity is central to understanding carbohydrates’ impact, emphasizing that it’s the excess consumption beyond metabolic requirements that poses a risk. The bloodstream can manage approximately one teaspoon (4g) of glucose at a time, with any excess provoking a harmful physiological response.

  • Conclusion: Dr. Fettke’s lecture serves as a compelling argument for reevaluating our carbohydrate intake, considering evolutionary dietary patterns, and recognizing the potential harms of exceeding our metabolic needs for carbohydrates.

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Insights based on numbers:

  • The human bloodstream can only manage about 4 grams of glucose at a time, equivalent to roughly one teaspoon. Exceeding this amount triggers a cascade of physiological responses aimed at removing the excess from the bloodstream, highlighting the body’s intolerance to high carbohydrate levels.
  • Comparing the dietary habits of our hunter-gatherer ancestors to the present day, the shift towards a high-carbohydrate diet over the last 10,000 years correlates with a significant decline in general health and the rise of metabolic diseases.

Example questions:

What does the video say about how the body metabolizes carbohydrates differently from fats and proteins?

Dr. Gary Fettke’s presentation delves into the distinct ways the human body processes carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, emphasizing the unique metabolic pathways involved for each. Here’s an overview based on his insights:

  • Carbohydrates: The body metabolizes carbohydrates primarily by breaking them down into glucose and fructose, which are then absorbed quickly from the gut. The metabolic system is designed to rapidly remove these sugars from the bloodstream to mitigate their toxic effects. Excess carbohydrates are seen as harmful because the body lacks a safe transport mechanism for them in the blood, leading to efforts to eliminate them quickly.

  • Fats: Fats are transported safely and efficiently in the bloodstream in the form of lipoproteins. These molecules vary in size and density but serve the crucial function of moving fat around the body without the toxicity associated with excess glucose. The metabolism of fats involves breaking them down into fatty acids and glycerol, which can be used directly for energy or stored for future use.

  • Proteins: Proteins are broken down into amino acids, which the body uses for various purposes, including energy, cell repair, and growth. Unlike carbohydrates, there are essential amino acids that must be obtained from the diet because the body cannot synthesize them. Proteins are metabolized in a way that supports these needs without producing toxic byproducts.

Dr. Fettke underscores that, unlike carbohydrates, there are essential fats and proteins that the body requires for optimal function.

Furthermore, he points out that while the body has mechanisms to create glucose through processes like gluconeogenesis when dietary carbohydrates are not available, there are no such essential dietary requirements for carbohydrates.

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This distinction highlights the body’s ability to prioritize and manage the metabolism of fats and proteins more safely and efficiently compared to carbohydrates.

What does the video say about the long-term health effects of consuming excess carbohydrates?

Dr. Gary Fettke’s lecture highlights several critical long-term health effects associated with the excessive consumption of carbohydrates:

  • Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: Chronic overconsumption of carbohydrates leads to high levels of glucose in the blood, prompting the pancreas to produce more insulin to facilitate glucose absorption by the cells. Over time, this can lead to insulin resistance, a condition where the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

  • Metabolic Disorders: Excess carbohydrate intake, particularly refined sugars, contributes to a range of metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. These conditions are often characterized by high blood pressure, elevated blood sugar levels, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels.

  • Organ Damage: Dr. Fettke discusses how advanced glycation end products (AGEs), harmful compounds formed when protein or fat combine with sugar in the bloodstream, contribute to the aging of cells. Over time, AGEs can lead to significant organ damage, affecting the heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves, and increase the risk of various chronic diseases.

  • Neurological Implications: The lecture also touches on the potential impact of high carbohydrate consumption on brain health. Conditions such as dementia (referred to as type 3 diabetes) are linked to high sugar diets, highlighting the importance of dietary choices in maintaining cognitive health.

  • Increased Inflammation and Oxidative Stress: Excessive carbohydrate intake can lead to increased levels of inflammation and oxidative stress within the body. These conditions are contributing factors to the development of chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and autoimmune disorders.

Dr. Fettke emphasizes the toxicity of excessive carbohydrate intake and its role in promoting various health issues. He advocates for a low-carb, healthy fat diet as a preventive strategy to mitigate these long-term health effects, suggesting that such dietary adjustments can have profound benefits on overall health and longevity.

What does the video say about how advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to chronic diseases and organ damage?

Dr. Gary Fettke’s lecture provides a detailed explanation of how advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to the development of chronic diseases and organ damage:

  • Formation of AGEs: AGEs are formed when protein or fat molecules combine with sugar in the bloodstream, a process known as glycation. This reaction can be accelerated by high levels of blood glucose, which is common in diets rich in excessive carbohydrates. AGEs are particularly harmful because they can alter the structure and function of proteins, leading to various pathological conditions.

  • Impact on Organs: AGEs have a significant impact on organ health. They are implicated in the damage to the kidneys, eyes, blood vessels, and nerves. For example, in the context of diabetes, AGEs contribute to diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease), retinopathy (eye disease), and neuropathy (nerve damage), leading to complications such as kidney failure, blindness, and loss of limb sensitivity, respectively.

  • Role in Chronic Diseases: The accumulation of AGEs in tissues is a key factor in the aging process and the development of chronic diseases. AGEs promote inflammation and oxidative stress, two mechanisms that underlie many chronic conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer’s disease (referred to as Type 3 diabetes by Dr. Fettke), and cancer. The inflammatory and oxidative stress responses triggered by AGEs can damage cells and tissues, leading to the gradual deterioration of bodily functions.

  • Mechanisms of Action: AGEs cause damage through direct and indirect mechanisms. Directly, they can crosslink with proteins, altering their normal function and leading to tissue stiffness and decreased elasticity. Indirectly, AGEs interact with specific receptors (RAGEs) on cell surfaces, triggering inflammation and oxidative stress pathways. These processes contribute to the vascular complications commonly seen in diabetes and other metabolic diseases.

  • Preventive Measures: Dr. Fettke emphasizes the importance of dietary choices in the formation of AGEs. By reducing the intake of high-carbohydrate foods, especially those that lead to high blood sugar levels, individuals can potentially lower the formation of AGEs and mitigate their harmful effects on health.

In summary, Dr. Fettke’s lecture sheds light on the critical role of AGEs in contributing to the development of chronic diseases and organ damage, highlighting the importance of managing carbohydrate intake to prevent these adverse health outcomes.

carbohydrate, the dose is the poison